Welcome Lori Kolstad; Mama’s Wisdom and Poker ; Good Poker Tables; 32 of 56 Seats filled for $1 Million Buy In

 

real lori kolstad

 A Session in the Life of a Low Stakes Casino Cash Grindin’ Girl

by Lori Kolstad

Gamblersdata is happy to welcome accomplished poker play Lori Kolstad to our weekly magazine.  Lori will provide a pro’s look into the world of poker or anything else she wants to write about.  We look forward to more from Lori – and expect some feathers to be ruffled!  That’s the way we like it!

It’s another Friday night, and I head into work. My profession is a lil’ different than most.

While most of my friends are going on dates with their significant others, putting their

children to bed or watching TV and winding down from their workdays, I have closed

up shop in the lingerie business and ready for my night shift~poker. I play 40 hours or

more a week in my local casinos in Biloxi, Mississippi, and tonight is my usual “busy”night.

As I drive in, I try to prepare my mind for the battle against mostly recreational, inebriated,

touristy players. I steel myself for the constant babble of inexperienced players that we all

endure night after night, session after session in low stakes 1-3 NL tables. For me, however,

I endure a little more than most of my poker playing friends. There’s been a lot of talk

lately about women in poker. For all the belief that the game is the same for men and women,

I am here to tell you that it is most definitely NOT the same! Just in the course of one session,

I usually am bombarded with table talk that is purely chauvinistic.

What I hear? Let me give you a few examples just from the past 40 hours of play.

Donkey:

“This is the BIG boys’ game. Are you just killing time while you wait for

your husband?”

Lori’s brain:

“Yes, you certainly ARE a big boy! That’s great! You will have the mass

behind you to ship those chips faster in my direction.”

Donkey:

“Little lady, the poker table is no place for a sweetheart like you. Let’s go

somewhere nicer and we can play strip poker.”

Lori’s brain:

“I now know why you are here at 9 pm on a Friday night. With lines like that, you

are not likely to go out on any dates.”

 Donkey:

“I fold. You must have it. No offense, but, honey, women don’t know how to

bluff. You will never be able to win in the end because of that. I will never pay

you off. No chips from me, baby!”

Lori’s Brain:

“ Are these imaginary chips that I am stacking? I’ve made you fold by the turn

to the tune of about 70 bbs by my calculations, but, what do I know? I’m just

a girl.”

Donkey:

(After he reraises me when the nut flush draw that I had been betting hits)

“Honey, I hit my card, just fold. I don’t wanna take your chips.”

Lori’s Brain:

“Donkey, EVERY card is your card! Just shove on me so I can snap you off, HONEY.”

As you can see, part of my job description is learning to tune this out, master my own mind-set, and make the most +EV decisions with every deal. It’s not online where I can

just shut off the chat , and sometimes, in spite of having to listen to these ignorant players,

I am happy to be in total control of the table texture.I am in my element, and as long as I know

this and they do not, I will win. as long as I am underestimated, I have a clear advantage.

Players, the next time you see a cute little thing sitting at your table, remember:

You just may be up against a female warrior.

‘Til next time, I wish you “rungood” , loose tables and most of all +EV from the felt

in Biloxi!

Lori Kolstad

Lori is a strictly cash game player of 11 years. She is the owner of the largest vintage lingerie site in the world, an activist for the Poker Players Alliance, Social Media Specialist, radio show hostess and fights daily for federal online poker legislation from her home in Biloxi, Mississippi.

 

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mamas wisdom

I can apply Mama’s wisdom to the game of poker
by Irene Edith
www.gamingtoday.com

Mama, bless her memory, said many years ago when I was in my late teens: “Sometimes you have to quit while you are ahead.”

Today, we will explore another piece of her advice:

“Sometimes it’s wise to make a change.”

Of course, Mama was referring to matters that have nothing to do with poker. As a matter of fact, Mama never played poker. At the time, my romance with my boyfriend was on shaky ground. We got into lots of arguments, in hindsight, often over the most foolish issues. And we both became upset.

We did try to work it out; even spoke to a psychologist friend of the family. We thought we were following her guidance; but the quarrels continued. That’s when I discussed the matter with Mama. I always valued her advice. She was the greatest! I am sure she knew I was troubled emotionally. For one thing, I rarely smiled around the house, and my appetite wasn’t what it used to be.

So, yes, this advice related to my love life. Still, as I have learned over the years, like so many things in life, I certainly can apply Mama’s wisdom to the game of poker. In this case, she suggested: “Sometimes it’s wise to make a change.”

Let me explain. It was not a good poker session for me.

The cards had not been going well for me this evening. I’m sure it has happened to you, too. You believe you are using the right strategies and tactics, and making accurate decisions; nevertheless, the poker gods seem to have shunned you.

When you are dealt a good starting hand like K-Q (a premium drawing hand), most of the time the flop seems to pass you by. And then, when you finally get a favorable piece of the flop (K-10-2) and play aggressively all the way to the river, betting and raise with top pair (two Kings), what do you think happens?

You guessed it! An Ace falls on the river, and an opponent with a lonely Ace-rag offsuit beats you out. Sure, if he were a half-way decent player he would have folded long before, but he doesn’t have an inkling of the relationship between card odds and pot odds.

He probably never heard that chasing was sure to make you a loser. Phil Hellmuth would have shouted at him, “Idiot!”

I hate to get rivered. Sure, it’s part of the game; but does it have to happen to me – over and over again?

Patience didn’t help

Sure, we all know you need to have patience when playing poker. But there has to be a limit to one’s patience. How long should you wait? Certainly, not until you go broke!

What’s the best thing you can do in such a case? That’s easy! Either call it a night and go home (tomorrow is bound to be a better day for you – you hope) or follow Mama’s advice: “Sometimes it’s wise to make a change.”

Change to another table, perhaps one with different stakes. But, in so doing, play cautiously the first orbit or two to study the new table. What kind of players are there? Is the table too tight or too aggressive? Make sure it’s to your liking.

Personally, I prefer loose-passive games. That way I can comfortably invest in drawing hands – especially since most starting-hands will be drawing hands that usually must improve to win the pot at the showdown. (Made hands – A-A, K-K, and Q-Q – are so rare.)

Ideally, you will enjoy your fair share of good starting-hands, like K-Q, that connect on the flop. You can expect to pair up one of three times. Then, you can focus on building “your” pot – unless you get rivered again. In that case, it’s wise to make a change! Time to quit and go home.

We invite your comments. Email to IreneEdith@GamingToday.com.

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monkey poker2
Defining what we call good poker tables
by Irene Edith
www.gamingtoday.com
Before we start on this “journey,” here’s a short quiz for you: Which U.S. president lost the White House’s fine china in a poker game?

(See answer at end of column.)

A “good” table is one at which you win. What makes a good table for you? How does the character of the table affect your chances of winning?

How many opponents stay to see the flop?

Is a “good” table one with few opponents staying to see the flop, so you have little competition for the pot? No way!

Intuitively, we all avoid tables that are too “tight” with only one or two opponents staying to see the flop. You make a monster hand but there is no money in the pot; and much of it may go for the casino’s rake.

Considering the vast majority of your starting hands will be drawing hands (usually must improve to win at the showdown), you want enough opponents in the pot to make it attractive when you do connect on the flop – especially when you catch a monster hand. That’s a “multiway” pot – three or more opponents staying to see the flop. That’s a “loose” table.

Sure, there are times – albeit rare – when you would prefer only two or three opponents see the flop with you. That’s when you are dealt a made hand – A-A, K-K, or Q-Q. In such infrequent cases, according to the laws of probability, your made hand becomes an underdog if four or more opponents stay in.

For the most part, a loose table where three or more opponents pay to see the flop is a better investment. Then, when your drawing hand connects on the flop, you can expect a decent pot as your reward.

Action before flop: Do you want to play at a table with lots of raising before the flop? No way; that makes it too expensive to stay for the flop with a drawing hand – and most of your starting hands will be drawing hands.

Certainly, lots of raising preflop is great when you happen to be dealt a big pocket pair, especially A-A or K-K. However, far more often you will be dealt a drawing hand. Mind you, even A-K is a drawing hand, albeit a “premium” one. Almost always, it must improve to take the pot (assuming you don’t try to bluff). Such a table is “passive” – in contrast to a “wild” or “aggressive” table.

So, in summary, most often you ought to prefer to play at a loose-passive table. But it doesn’t always happen that way.

What are your options? Often, you will be seated at a table with lots of betting and raising before the flop. The game is wild and too aggressive.

What can you do? Well, of course, you might just stay and play at that table, resolved to play only made and premium drawing hands. If luck goes your way, that could be extremely profitable.

One big problem: After your opponents realize you are a tight player, calling only with strong starting hands, they will be inclined to fold when you bet – and your winning pots get smaller.

Frequently, the raising is done by a very aggressive player – a “maniac.” You can try to be seated just to his left, so you can fold without investing a single chip when he raises – unless you have a made or premium drawing hand. (Then you have a good shot at winning a big pot.

Play very cautiously while waiting for such a seat to become available. But, if there are very aggressive players at that table, it’s not one at which it would be wise to stay and play for very long.

You might take a break from the game. Go for a walk; use the restroom; have a snack. While you are gone, perhaps the table texture will change more to your taste. Players come and go at the table. Maniacs often go broke. Too-tight players get disgusted with sitting ildly as their chip stacks recede every round while in the blinds.

Alternatively, another option – likely the best – is to ask the floor person for a table change.

Answer to our short quiz: It was Warren G. Harding who died in office at age 57.

Perhaps he was not playing at a “good” table!

We invite your comments. Email to IreneEdith@GamingToday.com.
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million dollar buy in
Thirty Two Of 56 Seats Already Secured In The 2014 World Series Of Poker $1 Million Buy-In

Many Big Name Pros Have Already Locked Up Seats
by Brian Pempus
www.cardplayer.com

The $1 million buy-in “Big One for One Drop” tournament at the 2014 World Series of Poker kicks off in late June, but already a majority of the seats in the tournament have been secured, the WSOP said Monday in a press release.

The event is capped at 56 players and could award more than $20 million to the winner.

In March, the first batch of confirmed participants was released. A total of 10 more were added to the list during the second week of May.

Less than 24 hours before the WSOP released an updated list, Jean-Robert Bellande Tweeted a photo of him buying into the event with bricks of cash.

Here’s a look who is playing so far:

Antonio Esfandiari
Guy Laliberté
Bobby Baldwin
David Einhorn
Phil Galfond
Philipp Gruissem
Phil Ivey
Jason Mercier
Paul Newey
Bill Perkins
Vivek Rajkumar
Brian Rast
Andrew Robl
Erik Seidel
Brandon Steven
Sam Trickett
Noah Schwartz
Tobias Reinkemeier
Vanessa Selbst
Jean-Robert Bellande
Fabian Quoss
Max Altergott
Anthony Gregg
Igor Kurganov
Christoph Vogelsang
Anonymous Asian Businessman
Anonymous Businessman
Anonymous Businessman
Anonymous Businessman
Aria Resort Satellite Seat
Bellagio Resort Satellite Seat
World Series of Poker Satellite Seat

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